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NEWS
By Dan Fiorucci and Channel 2 News | September 22, 2012
The Air Force believes that it's solved the years-long mystery of why F-22 pilots have suffered potentially dangerous, hypoxia-like symptoms aboard the world's most advanced jet fighter. And the answer is so insanely simple, some Congressmen don't believe it. It's primarily clothing! According to Congressional Testimony by NASA and Air Force experts earlier this month, the problem lies with an inflatable combat vest that was worn -- in combination with rubberized cold-weather survival gear needed for ejection by pilots over cold water.
NEWS
July 20, 2013
CHANNEL 2 NEWS 907-762-9202     FAX 907-561-0874 Mailing Address: KTUU-TV 701 East Tudor Road, Suite #220 Anchorage, Alaska 99503-7488 Phone: 907-762-9202  FAX: 907-561-0874 DUB REQUESTS To order a copy of a news story call Universal at 1-800-408-3178 or email orders@universal-info.com Call For Pricing Send story ideas to the news desk: ...
NEWS
By Rebecca Palsha and Chris Klint and Channel 2 News | January 8, 2013
A federal judge sentenced 28-year-old Fairbanks Schaeffer Cox, convicted in June as the ringleader of a plot to kidnap or kill federal agents, to nearly 26 years in prison Tuesday. Before he was sentenced, Cox asked for mercy and apologized to the people involved in the case. “I know I put myself here,” Cox said. Cox's 310-month sentence comes a day after the sentencing of conspirators Lonnie and Karen Vernon. Lonnie Vernon received a nearly identical sentence to Cox, while Karen Vernon was sentenced to 12 years in prison.
NEWS
Michelle Theriault Boots | May 13, 2011
In the last 10 years, Alaska’s Hispanic population has jumped by 51.8 percent, making it the fastest growing minority group in the state. Daniel Esparza, who grew up in Zacatecas, Mexico is in a good position to consider the long view: He’s a Mexican-American who has lived in Alaska for 37 years. To him, it’s obvious what’s drawing people to the Northernmost U.S. state: “It’s adventure and opportunity,” he said. The highlights of the Census data released this week included: -Alaska's Hispanic population was 25,852 in the 2000 Census to 39,249 in the 2010 Census - The number of people who identified themselves as being of Mexican descent jumped from roughly 13,300 to 21,600 - People who identify themselves as Mexican make up 55 percent of Alaska’s whole Hispanic population, followed by  Puerto Rican and Cuban -While Hispanics now make up 5.5 percent of Alaska’s population in 2010, that’s still much less than the 16.3 percent they make up of the entire U.S. population.
NEWS
by Michelle Theriault Boots | October 26, 2011
It happens every day of the week in courtrooms all over Alaska. Today, in Judge Michael Spaan's Anchorage courtroom, the applicant is a woman with curly black hair, a mother.  The judge is hearing bail applications and arraignments. She's ushered from the spectator benches to a podium, where she swears to tell the truth.  She looks at her son, accused of assault and weapons charges in a robbery-gone-wrong. He wears an yellow jumpsuit, handcuffed to another detainee in the jury box. She is his ticket to bail, which would mean getting out of jail until his trial.
NEWS
By Austin Baird and Channel 2 News | September 25, 2013
Detectives with the Anchorage Police Department have accused Kevin Brent Shedlock, a Glennallen dentist, of sexually assaulting an incapacitated female. Shedlock was arrested Tuesday by detectives with the Special Victims Unit and Alaska State Troopers, and he was charged with four counts of second degree sexual assault. The charges stem from a late August incident at an Anchorage hotel.  He was arraigned in district court Wednesday, and bail was set at $50,000. Anchorage Police believe there may be other  victims of Shedlock, and anyone with additional information is asked to call Anchorage Police at 786-8900.
NEWS
Michelle Theriault Boots | July 19, 2011
Soteria House was supposed to be a safe place. The sprawling green multiplex on Doris Street was designed to be a respite from psychiatric wards and institutions; a chance for young people diagnosed with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia to live in a place that was like a home, not a hospital, making choices for themselves.  “The message always is 'we are here to keep you safe,'” wrote Susan Musante, the site manager, in a fact sheet about Soteria House's philosophy.
NEWS
Michelle Theriault Boots | September 12, 2011
Golf-ball sized and tomato-red, rose hips are everywhere these days - in overgrown alleyways, urban forests and backyards around Southcentral Alaska. But while Alaskans often have a finely-honed autumn routine of harvesting raspberries, blueberries and cranberries, the edible fruit of wild roses remains mysterious to many, says Leslie Shallcross, a home economist and professor at UAF's Cooperative Extension Service. “People let the moose and birds eat them,” says Shallcross.
NEWS
By Joshua Staab and Channel 2 News | May 31, 2013
One of the largest trucking companies in Alaska has been acquired by a privately-held Seattle-based transportation and petroleum distributor. Carlile Transportation Systems has effectively become a member of the Saltchuck Resources family of businesses, in a transaction that closed May 31. “Our relationship with Saltchuk is 20 years long, already having been friends, vendors and customers.  I really feel this is a match made in heaven,” said...
NEWS
By Chris Klint and Mike Ross and Channel 2 News | August 6, 2012
State prosecutors announced Monday that they will not seek a second murder indictment against Mechele Linehan, the woman whose 2007 conviction for the 1996 murder of Kent Leppink was subsequently overturned. Both Linehan and John Carlin III were convicted of first-degree murder in Leppink's death after prosecutors said Linehan, a former stripper, convinced Carlin to kill Leppink. The Alaska Court of Appeals overturned Linehan's conviction in 2010, noting that the state's case against her was circumstantial and that three pieces of evidence, including a letter written by Leppink implicating Linehan were he to die suspiciously, were improperly admitted at trial.
NEWS
By Neil Torquiano and Channel 2 News | April 1, 2013
Alaska State Troopers say a veteran pilot, a Talkeetna-based trooper and a rescued snowmachiner died when an AST helicopter crashed overnight Saturday during a search-and-rescue mission near Talkeetna. In a somber Monday press conference held at AST headquarters on Tudor Road in Anchorage, Alaska Department of Public Safety Commissioner tentatively identified the dead as 55-year-old Anchorage-based pilot Mel Nading, 40-year-old trooper Tage Toll and 56-year-old Talkeetna man Carl Ober.
NEWS
By Todd Walker and Channel 2 News | July 5, 2012
Several electronic road construction signs around Anchorage were hacked late Wednesday night or early Thursday morning, according to the state Department of Transportation. Signs that normally display closure and detour information, like the one on Minnesota Drive near 100th Avenue, were changed to read “Impeach Obama.” That particular sign wasn't fixed until sometime between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. Thursday. It happened because DOT says it doesn't lock the boxes on the signs that hold the message control pad. Construction managers say sign-hacking has never happened before, so they never thought to lock the boxes.
NEWS
By Tim Akimoff | May 24, 2011
So you want to walk on a glacier. The first order of business is to find a glacier to walk on. Turns out that a suitable speciman exists just a little more than a two-hour drive from Anchorage. The Matanuska Glacier is a 27-mile long, 4-mile wide river of ice that wends its way down out of the Chugach Mountains. And it happens to be one of the most car-accessible glaciers in the United States. Getting There - Take the Glenn Highway north of Anchorage. Your first choice is taking the Old Glen Highway at about milepost 29. The old road runs up along the Knik River and across to Palmer.
NEWS
By Chris Klint and Channel 2 News | July 10, 2013
Alaska State Troopers have received a new helicopter and hired a new civilian pilot, following the spring crash of an AST chopper near Talkeetna that killed three people. Pilot Mel Nading, as well as Talkeetna residents Trooper Tage Toll and Carl Ober, died March 30 when AST's Helo-1 hit the ground upside-down and burned during a mission to pick up Ober, who had been injured while snowmachining. Nading and Toll's bodies later received a police escort to and from their autopsies in Anchorage, and Toll's name was added to the Alaska Police Memorial in May. According to AST spokesperson Megan Peters, employees with the state Department of Public Safety went to Texas last week to take possession of the new aircraft, an American Eurocopter AS350B3e -- the same model of helicopter as its predecessor.
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