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by Channel 2 News Staff | December 1, 2010
The Air Force has suspended recovery efforts for the F-22 jet that crashed Nov. 16 near Cantwell. The Air Force has recovered the remains of the pilot, Capt. Jeff Haney. Air Force officials say they have cleaned up the crash site as much as they can, but that any debris found in the area should not be handled due to the hazardous materials used to construct the plane. They say visible pieces of the wreckage have been removed from the site. Officials say the materials used in the plane could irritate skin or cause a rash, and that other parts of the plane that may be exposed by wind or water could contain pressurized gases or flammables.
NEWS
By Channel 2 News staff | November 22, 2010
Family and colleagues bid their final farewell Monday to Capt. Jeffrey Haney. Despite icy road conditions, the memorial service for Haney took place at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. According to spokesperson Corinna Jones, even though only essential personnel had to report to work Monday, co-workers and commanders still turned out to pay their respects to the fighter pilot killed in last week's F-22 crash. Jones said for the family's sake they wanted the service to go on as planned.
NEWS
By Chris Klint and KTUU.com | October 16, 2011
An Air Force Reserve unit stationed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson resumed flying F-22 Raptors Saturday, following the lifting of a four-month-long stand-down order for the Raptor fleet issued amid concerns about the stealth fighters' oxygen systems. According to 477th Fighter Group spokesperson Capt. Ashley Conner, six F-22s with the 302nd Fighter Squadron took off from JBER at 9 a.m. Saturday as part of the 477th's monthly drill weekend. "Most of our pilots integrated into the flying schedule when our active duty counterparts returned to flight earlier this month," said Lt. Col. David Piffarerio, the squadron's commander.
NEWS
by Christine Kim and Channel 2 News | November 18, 2010
The Air Force has confirmed the identity of an F-22 Raptor fighter pilot whose plane crashed Tuesday night. Officials say 525th Fighter Squadron Capt. Jeffrey Haney, who is originally from Michigan, remains listed as missing. The F-22 crashed in Interior Alaska while on a training run. The plane lost contact with ground radar at 7:40 p.m. The crash site was found Wednesday morning about 100 miles north of Anchorage. The Jackson Citizen Patriot of Jackson County, Mich., says Haney's mother lives in Jackson County and is on her way to Anchorage, according to Haney's stepdad.
NEWS
by Channel 2 News staff | November 20, 2010
A Monday memorial service has been scheduled for Capt. Jeffrey Haney, who died in the Tuesday crash of his F-22 Raptor fighter. The service will take place in Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson's Hangar 1, at 11551 Slammer Avenue, at 3:25 p.m. Select friends of the family and JBER personnel are invited to attend. Wreckage recovery efforts continued Saturday at the crash site 100 miles north of Anchorage, after a crew reached the site Friday and determined that Haney was killed in the crash.
NEWS
April 21, 2010
by Channel 2 News staff Tuesday, April 20, 2010 ELMENDORF AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska -- Eight F-22 Raptor pilots assigned to the 90th Fighter Squadron returned to Elmendorf Air Force Base Tuesday night. The pilots were on a four-month deployment at Andersen Air Force Base in Guam. While in Guam, the pilots trained for combat. This is the unit's third deployment since being activated nearly three years ago. For the pilots, bringing something from home helps them get through the trip.
NEWS
by Christine Kim | November 19, 2010
The Air Force says search-and-rescue teams found conclusive evidence Friday that an F-22 Raptor pilot, 31-year-old Capt. Jeffrey Haney, did not survive the crash of his aircraft 100 miles north of Anchorage Tuesday night. Military officials said at a press conference Friday that when ground personnel reached the crash site, three days into the search-and-rescue effort, they found a part of Haney's ejection seat and some personal gear -- including part of his flight suit. The Air Force says the state Department of Transportation cleared nearly 75 miles of roadway along the Denali Highway for Army convoys to get through.
NEWS
by Jackie Bartz and Channel 2 News | September 20, 2011
The nation's fleet of grounded F-22 Raptor fighter jets is set to resume flying after a four-month stand-down, according to senior U.S. Air Force officials.   "We now have enough insight from recent studies and investigations that a return to flight is prudent and appropriate," U.S. Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz said in a statement released on the Air Force website. The nation's most advanced fighter jet fleet was grounded May 3, 2011, following 12 reports that pilots experienced hypoxia-like symptoms.  The incidents began in 2008, according to the Air Force.     In November 2010, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson based pilot Capt.
NEWS
By Dan Fiorucci and Channel 2 News | September 22, 2012
The Air Force believes that it's solved the years-long mystery of why F-22 pilots have suffered potentially dangerous, hypoxia-like symptoms aboard the world's most advanced jet fighter. And the answer is so insanely simple, some Congressmen don't believe it. It's primarily clothing! According to Congressional Testimony by NASA and Air Force experts earlier this month, the problem lies with an inflatable combat vest that was worn -- in combination with rubberized cold-weather survival gear needed for ejection by pilots over cold water.
NEWS
by Jackie Bartz and Channel 2 News | July 26, 2011
The Air Force Times is reporting toxins leaking into cockpits may be poisoning F-22 pilots. Raptors remain grounded pending an investigation into the aircraft's oxygen generators.  Pilots at six of the seven bases in the United States that house F-22s have experienced "hypoxialike systems", according to Air Force Times reporter Dave Majumdar.  Majumdar began looking into problems with the F-22 fleet following last November's crash that...
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NEWS
By Chris Klint and Channel 2 News | February 11, 2013
A recent report from the Pentagon's inspector general is taking aim at findings on the fatal 2010 crash of an F-22 Raptor from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson near Talkeetna, which the Air Force blamed on the stealth fighter's pilot. Capt. Jeffrey Haney, assigned to the 525th Fighter Squadron, was flying an exercise on Nov. 16, 2010 with another Raptor when his plane fell off radar screens and crashed about 100 miles north of Anchorage. The Air Force's Aircraft Accident Investigation Board found that Haney, who didn't eject before the crash, had failed to activate an emergency oxygen system after a failure of the Raptor's primary oxygen system.
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NEWS
By Abby Hancock | January 27, 2013
A Joint Base Richardson-Elmendorf pilot carried out a very special mission on Thursday, after hearing about a unique request from a 9 year-old boy who had lost his father. Army Staff Sgt. Justin Gallegos was killed in Afghanistan in 2009. His son MacAidan, who goes by "Mac", was five years old at the time. Every year on January 24th, his father's birthday, MacAidan and his mother celebrate by doing something special like baking cupcakes or throwing a party. But this year, MacAidan, now nine years old, decided to celebrate differently.
NEWS
By Dan Fiorucci and Channel 2 News | September 22, 2012
The Air Force believes that it's solved the years-long mystery of why F-22 pilots have suffered potentially dangerous, hypoxia-like symptoms aboard the world's most advanced jet fighter. And the answer is so insanely simple, some Congressmen don't believe it. It's primarily clothing! According to Congressional Testimony by NASA and Air Force experts earlier this month, the problem lies with an inflatable combat vest that was worn -- in combination with rubberized cold-weather survival gear needed for ejection by pilots over cold water.
NEWS
By Chris Klint and Channel 2 News | July 24, 2012
The Air Force has determined that a valve in F-22 Raptor pilots' pressure-suit vests are to blame for a string of hypoxia-related incidents, and is taking steps to replace the valves and relax flight restrictions placed on the stealth fighters. According to an Air Force Times report Tuesday, the valves in the pressure suits will be replaced and a filter installed to measure pilots' air quality will be removed. A squadron of F-22s is expected to make a trans-Pacific flight to Kadena Air Base in Japan within the next few days, marking a show of confidence that the cause of the aircraft's problems has been found.
NEWS
By Dan Fiorucci and Channel 2 News | May 17, 2012
Two days after Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta ordered flight restrictions on all F-22 Raptor fighters, the jets are still flying -- but they've been ordered to stay closer to base. People living around Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson aren't likely to notice any difference in terms of noise or other factors; the idea is simply to keep pilots safe. The decision comes after a report on the CBS TV program "60 Minutes" saying that at least two F-22 pilots are now refusing to fly. The reason: the planes may have a fleetwide defect -- a potentially faulty oxygen system.
NEWS
By Bronwyn Saito and Channel 2 News | May 5, 2012
The last F-22 Raptor produced was welcomed by the U.S. Air Force Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Saturday, May 5. Lt. Col. Paul Moga accepted the "keys" to the fighter jet in Marietta, GA., where, back in December, it was the last one off the assembly line.  Moga then flew the Raptor cross-country from Marietta to J-BER in a non-stop, eight hour flight.  The jet, tail number 4195, will be flown as the flagship for the 525th Fighter...
NEWS
By Jackie Bartz and Channel 2 News | December 14, 2011
The Air Force Times is reporting the U.S. Air Force is blaming pilot error for an F-22 raptor crash that killed an Alaska-based pilot. Capt. Jeff Haney was killed near Denali in November 2010.  According to the article, the U.S. Air Force Accident Investigation Board reports there was a malfunction with the jet's bleed air intake and that automatically triggered a shut down of multiple systems, including the primary oxygen system.  ...
NEWS
By Michelle Theriault-Boots and Channel 2 News | November 4, 2011
Lt. Col. David Piffarerio made history when he touched down at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage Friday afternoon: He became the first Air Force pilot to log 1,000 hours flying in the cockpit of a sleek F-22 Raptor fighter jet. On Friday, he exited the cockpit via a black ladder pushed up to the side of the aircraft and got a traditional champagne water spray-down from his fellow squadron members and wife Jennifer. On today's training mission - also known as a “sortie” - he and another pilot took the jets to the Alaska Range for exercises.
NEWS
By Chris Klint, Christine Kim and Kortnie Horazdovsky and Channel 2 News | October 24, 2011
Updated 12:57 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24: Officials at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson say the F-22s at JBER are flying again, after the pause over the weekend. Spokesperson Corrina Jones says the JBER planes were only grounded as a precaution in response to the incident at Langley. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- INITIAL STORY: All F-22 Raptors at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson as well as Langley Air Force Base in Virginia are under orders for a "pause in flight," after a Raptor pilot at Langley reported losing oxygen in mid-flight.
NEWS
By Chris Klint and KTUU.com | October 16, 2011
An Air Force Reserve unit stationed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson resumed flying F-22 Raptors Saturday, following the lifting of a four-month-long stand-down order for the Raptor fleet issued amid concerns about the stealth fighters' oxygen systems. According to 477th Fighter Group spokesperson Capt. Ashley Conner, six F-22s with the 302nd Fighter Squadron took off from JBER at 9 a.m. Saturday as part of the 477th's monthly drill weekend. "Most of our pilots integrated into the flying schedule when our active duty counterparts returned to flight earlier this month," said Lt. Col. David Piffarerio, the squadron's commander.
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